Teddy Has An Operation by zefrank1 — This guy is so freakin’ weird! Gr8 writing.

Try this, it’s fun!
The book nearest to me on my desk is a copy of my own novel HOOKED. The sentence I got is, “They always treated him as if he were a living ice cube when he came in.”
Hey, that’s not fair! And it’s worse cuz I wrote it!!

Try this, it’s fun!

The book nearest to me on my desk is a copy of my own novel HOOKED. The sentence I got is, “They always treated him as if he were a living ice cube when he came in.”

Hey, that’s not fair! And it’s worse cuz I wrote it!!

Can hardly wait 4 #Eyebrows debut! In his honor, I encourage every Whovian 2 read another great Doctor’s story — Tom Baker’s autobio. It’s a  hoot!

Can hardly wait 4 #Eyebrows debut! In his honor, I encourage every Whovian 2 read another great Doctor’s story — Tom Baker’s autobio. It’s a  hoot!

Got this off Pinterest. HA!

Got this off Pinterest. HA!

#throwbackthursday One of th 350 Star Trek Universe cards I wrote 4 Atlas Editions back in th 90s. Fun job!

#throwbackthursday 1979 album soundtrack Doctor Who “Genesis of the Daleks.” The DVD of its time!

#throwbackthursday 1979 album soundtrack Doctor Who “Genesis of the Daleks.” The DVD of its time!

shyhipstergeek:

Current comic trade I am reading, Darkwing Duck Classics Volume 1. #comictrade #reading #darkwingduck #classics

Hey, shyhipstergeek, my hubby David Cody Weiss was the editor of the DW series! I can’t tell you how weird it is to hear the comic referred to as “classic.” HA! (Did you know that Darkwing’s original name was 00Duck until the James Bond folk heard about it? Talk about clash of the titans.)

shyhipstergeek:

Current comic trade I am reading, Darkwing Duck Classics Volume 1. #comictrade #reading #darkwingduck #classics

Hey, shyhipstergeek, my hubby David Cody Weiss was the editor of the DW series! I can’t tell you how weird it is to hear the comic referred to as “classic.” HA! (Did you know that Darkwing’s original name was 00Duck until the James Bond folk heard about it? Talk about clash of the titans.)

(via fuckyeahreading)

HEAR YE, HEAR YE! This pic says it all. That’s a LOT of movies, newsreels, historical pics—a ton of stuff. I’m gonna go check it out!

HEAR YE, HEAR YE! This pic says it all. That’s a LOT of movies, newsreels, historical pics—a ton of stuff. I’m gonna go check it out!

doctordistress:

Get your minds out of the temporal gutter.

I wonder what deranged show techie built that gizmo. (As they used to say, “It’s a phallic symbol if it’s longer than it’s wide!”)

doctordistress:

Get your minds out of the temporal gutter.

I wonder what deranged show techie built that gizmo. (As they used to say, “It’s a phallic symbol if it’s longer than it’s wide!”)

(via rointheta)

Got this from writer #CindyDees via The League of Independent Writers on Facebook. Yup, this hits the nail on the head!

Got this from writer #CindyDees via The League of Independent Writers on Facebook. Yup, this hits the nail on the head!

#fridayreads This is one of my favorite books. I first read it in high school, and this is the copy I read. It’s still in perfect condition, of course, not a wrinkle or bend. It was written by master SF writer Robert A. Heinlein in 1957, and any kid now might say, “Well, it must be dorky then.” OH NO. This book reads like it could have been written today. Great style, great characters. The plot moves along with no lulls, and the “science” in it is minimal. This is a story about people, with science peppered in enough to show that the main character is an engineer, but nothing confusing at all. What’s fun is Heinlein’s view of the “future.”
He wrote it in 1957. His story starts in 1970, already his “future.” It’s so cute—more automation and gadgets in everyday life than really existed in 1970. Then the main character ends up in the year 2000 (no, this is not a plot spoiler, it’s pretty obvious this happens if you read the back cover). And Heinlein’s view of 2000 is beyond cute. Wow, robots and space travel and all that—I wish!
I recommend this book to all young and adult readers. In fact, read anything by Heinlein. He’s among the greatest of all SF writers, and most of his stuff is not technically difficult (leave that to Niven and others). I especially like my old copy of the book (pictured) because the cover illo is just so psychedelic, man!
ADDED NOTE: I had to edit and add this—I just researched a bit and found out that, in 1957, there was no concept of the modern computer. By that I mean that Heinlein and his SF cronies did not live in a world where the idea of a thinking/computing box that could connect people via a keyboard and exchange info, let alone pictures, ect., did not exist. To me, this makes Heinlein’s vision of the future even more interesting.

#fridayreads This is one of my favorite books. I first read it in high school, and this is the copy I read. It’s still in perfect condition, of course, not a wrinkle or bend. It was written by master SF writer Robert A. Heinlein in 1957, and any kid now might say, “Well, it must be dorky then.” OH NO. This book reads like it could have been written today. Great style, great characters. The plot moves along with no lulls, and the “science” in it is minimal. This is a story about people, with science peppered in enough to show that the main character is an engineer, but nothing confusing at all. What’s fun is Heinlein’s view of the “future.”

He wrote it in 1957. His story starts in 1970, already his “future.” It’s so cute—more automation and gadgets in everyday life than really existed in 1970. Then the main character ends up in the year 2000 (no, this is not a plot spoiler, it’s pretty obvious this happens if you read the back cover). And Heinlein’s view of 2000 is beyond cute. Wow, robots and space travel and all that—I wish!

I recommend this book to all young and adult readers. In fact, read anything by Heinlein. He’s among the greatest of all SF writers, and most of his stuff is not technically difficult (leave that to Niven and others). I especially like my old copy of the book (pictured) because the cover illo is just so psychedelic, man!

ADDED NOTE: I had to edit and add this—I just researched a bit and found out that, in 1957, there was no concept of the modern computer. By that I mean that Heinlein and his SF cronies did not live in a world where the idea of a thinking/computing box that could connect people via a keyboard and exchange info, let alone pictures, ect., did not exist. To me, this makes Heinlein’s vision of the future even more interesting.